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KURA

Wallace Pato, photo: Julia Thompson
Wallace Pato, photo: Julia Thompson

Kura, from the German word
Kuratorium, means curatorship.

Alfredo Volpi & Sergio Camargo, photo: Julia Thompson
Alfredo Volpi & Sergio Camargo, photo: Julia Thompson

Founded in 2018 by Camila Yunes Guarita, Kura Arte is an art advisory service. Our goal is to demystify the art world, promoting dialogue between different market agents – collectors, artists, galleries and institutions. In the midst of a vast and diverse artistic production, Kura meets the demands of an effervescent cultural scene, providing guidance to collectors, cataloging private collections, helping young emerging artists to navigate the market and carrying out special curatorial projects.

Beyond what
meets the eyes

Camila Yunes Guarita
Camila Yunes Guarita

Graduated in Architecture at Mackenzie University (São Paulo, Brasil) and École Nationale d’Architecture Paris Val de Seine, Camila Yunes Guarita also attended Contemporary Art and Its Market, How the Art World Works and Foundations in History of Art at Sotheby’s London. She worked with sales & liaisons at Galleria Continua, Galeria Nara Roesler and on the production team at Aveline Gallery. She co-founded GoART Art Advising from 2015 to 2018 and since 2018 she has been VIP Representative for ARCO Madrid and Lisboa and founder and executive director at Kura.

Camila Yunes Guarita

Alicja Kwade. Photo: Julia Thompson
Alicja Kwade. Photo: Julia Thompson

Kura provides bespoke guidance tailored to the interests and wishes of its clients, accompanying them at every stage of the acquisition process. We inform collectors of market trends in the art world and develop a strategy that will maximize value, quality, and significance of their art.

  • Developing a strategic plan;
  • Market research on a local and international scale;
  • Sales and acquisitions;
  • Pre and post-sales logistics;
  • Secondary market sales strategies;
  • Access to key players in the arts system including curators in leading institutions, collectors and museum directors;
  • Advising on loans to museums and institutions.
Photo: Estevan dos Anjos
Photo: Estevan dos Anjos

Expanding its art advisory services, Kura created an area dedicated to the cataloguing of private collections, organizing them both physically and digitally.

  • Cataloguing and collection database;
  • Coordination and oversight of shipping, framing, installation, storage and conservation;
  • Dialogue with external agents – institutions, cultural centers, other private collections and auction houses;
  • Appraisal services for insurance, taxation, loans;
  • Digital or printed publication.
Rizza, A Criação, 2020
Rizza, A Criação, 2020

Understanding that the process of creation and circulation of artworks demand different strategies, KURA aims to provide an environment of support and advice for young emerging artists.

  • Assistance with creative process, projects and exhibitions development;
  • Conceptual discussions about the work;
  • Research and presentation of references;
  • Portfolio development;
  • Production of critical texts on the works, projects and exhibitions;
  • Registration in residences, salons and prizes;
  • Pricing of works according to the national market;
  • Strategic planning and content production for social media.
Array
Sandra Cinto, foto: Julia Thompson

Kura develops customized projects with different brands, bringing contemporary art into other segments by curating and promoting stimulating experiences.

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Ana Dias Batista, 2018

#2
Ana Dias Batista, 2018

Ana Dias Batista, 2018
In partnership with Galeria Marília Razuk

01.10.2018 – 30.11.2018

Mistério do mundo
Curatorial text by Jacopo Crivelli Visconti

It is only shallow people who do not judge by appearances. The true mystery of the world is the visible, not the invisible.

Oscar Wilde, The Picture of Dorian Gray

Projeto Caixa de Pandora, 2018 © Everton Ballardin
Projeto Caixa de Pandora, 2018 © Everton Ballardin

Dead Language, the PhD thesis of Ana Luiza Dias Batista, consists of a meticulous description of her work up to that moment. Without the pretension of analyzing or criticizing, Ana Luiza prefers to “avoid interpretations and take everything literally” 1, merely describing the works in detail, creating juxtapositions that transpose time and especially the space in which each was conceived and created, shedding light on the modus operandi that underlies all of them. This strategy (descriptive rather than analytical) is extremely relevant and consistent with the work in general, if we consider how often her interventions seek to remain on the surface of things, overlapping with the exhibition space in an almost imperceptible way, or mimicking itself programmatically (Errata, 2017; Cortina, 2015; Insônia, 2013; Fardo, 2013; Fotolitos: Desembaçadores, 2010; Queimada, 2009; Hipódromo, 2009, are a few that come to mind). Other works are inspired by a notion of scale, and, therefore, presuppose the same process of approximation and almost physical comparison that the thesis, with its paratactic organization, suggests (Painel, 2015; Eva, 2014; Molde-Modelo, 2015; Abismo, 2013; Pulga, 2013; H16, Mendes Wood DM, São Paulo, 2013; Escalímetro, 2013, among many others as well). These two aspects are often complementary: Eva, for example, is inspired by a homonymous 1980s theme park attraction in which visitors could walk inside the body of a gigantic woman and wander around. By reducing the scale of the doll to that of a real woman, Ana Luiza operates a change of scale that, despite not flattening the figure, somehow obliterates its three-dimensionality: “it has no interior to reach” 2. Removing the interior of a Renaissance sculpture could be a conceptually powerful intervention but would not substantially affect its meaning. On the other hand, in the case of Eva, the interior course constituted its raison d’être: by making her pure exteriority, Ana Luiza sets off a series of reflections and displacements that ultimately constitute the “new” Eva’s reason for being. It is in this subtle inversion or subversion of appearances and possible interpretations that, to a large extent, her work takes place.

Projeto Caixa de Pandora, 2018 © Everton Ballardin
Projeto Caixa de Pandora, 2018 © Everton Ballardin

The interventions that make up Águia de duas cabeças generally follow similar procedures, guided more precisely by two essential actions: displacing and disguising, complemented by a third that simultaneously represents the opposite of the previous two: highlighting something without changing its place or its function. The clearest example of displacement is in Pilhagem: all of the rugs in the house are piled on top of each other, in the shape of a cross, in the living room of the new wing of the house. At the top of the pile is the rug that already belonged to that spot, as if all the others had come to hide beneath it. The rugs also appeared in the recent solo show at Galeria Marília Razuk, however, if there the pile layout that’s typical of rug stores seemed to allude directly to the commercial dimension of the exhibition, here, the accumulation finds its direct counterpoint in the way that the paintings of the Ivani and Jorge Yunes collection occupy the entire surface of the walls, without any solution of continuity. The second action, that of dissimulation, whether it be through the bias of masquerade, mimicry or camouflage, characterizes A rotina do polvo and Figuração. For the first, Ana Luiza commissioned a synchronized swimming choreography inspired by the movements of an octopus, to be performed in the pool of the house. The mandatory figures in official synchronized swimming competitions are always based on animals (like carp or flamingo), but the octopus chosen by the artist has the peculiarity of being able to change the color and the opacity of its epidermis to camouflage itself. In Figuração, the performers are not human, but animals: two owls trained to remain perfectly still, like the sculptures that surround them. This typology of camouflage, in which the animal takes the form of the surrounding flora and remains immobile, is called homotype, whereas homochromia is the ability to change colors in order to blend in with the surroundings. In this sense Homocromia could very well be the title of a performance whose protagonist is an octopus: this play on the titles and works, which continues throughout the house, is not accidental, and emphasizes how all the interventions complement each other and respond to each other. And so, Homocromia is both the name of a displacement and a camouflage: the art deco portrait of a woman, framed in an acrylic box that concealed the entrance to a service room below the staircase leading to the upper floor, was replaced by a trompe-l’oeil which reproduces, on a 1:1 scale, the same portrait, painted directly on the door and wall. The camouflage is reversed here, since, despite replicating what was there, the function of hiding the door is suspended. A final set of works, as we said before, does not operate dislocations or dissimulations, but draws the visitor’s attention to elements of the house or collection. If this already happens with the pool when occupied by the octopus, and with the columns that support the owl-sculptures in Figuração, in Agrimensor and Tremor essencial, this strategy is even clearer. In the first, a 3×3 meter grid is outlined over the entire garden area of the house and subsequently drawn, in the artist’s words, “not by addition but by subtraction. In alternating squares there will be pruning, maintenance, replenishment of grass and plants; in the other squares nothing will be done. The grass will grow, the weeds will not be pulled, the plants will not be pruned.” The grid, commonly used in scale representations, will thus appear throughout the exhibition, gradually bringing reality closer to its own representation. Tremor essencial surprises visitors with the rattling of objects sitting on some of the window sills of the house, as if their steps made the walls tremble and suddenly awakened the sleeping objects.

Projeto Caixa de Pandora, 2018 © Everton Ballardin
Projeto Caixa de Pandora, 2018 © Everton Ballardin

In all the interventions we have seen up until now, the artist has merely moved elements around or given a new purpose to spaces in the house and collection, apparently interested mainly in the performative character of these interventions. The actual performances (A rotina do polvo and Figuração) are characterized by an ambivalence between the human and the animal, with the artificial, hovering over both: in the first, the choreography of the swimmers is obviously artificial, inspired by the movements of an animal; in the second, the artificial immobility suggests the absence of a more intimately animal quality, that is, spontaneity. Even though it is evidently less literal, the other works also allude to or presuppose a kind of performance or choreography, whether it be in the growing grass (Agrimensor), in objects that make noise (Tremor essencial), in the rugs that are piled up (Pilhagem) or in the frame that disappears letting the trompe-l’oeil (Homochromia) appear. But Águia de duas cabeças includes yet another work, the only object that Ana Luiza adds to the unabashed collection of objects that already occupy and characterize the house so powerfully. The choice of working almost exclusively with the existing objects was not accidental: the artist herself explains that she defined this strategy because “an eclectic universe, composed of objects from different periods, materials and provenances, neutralizes in advance the potential for strangeness and reflexivity of new objects.” In fact, the only object she considered strong enough is not a work of art in the conventional sense, nor does it represent a new image in the context of the house: to make Trompe-l’oeil 3, the artist hired a specialist to produce two glass eye prosthesis which almost perfectly reproduce the size of the globe and iris, the color, and even the veins, of the eyes of Dona Ivani, the mistress of the house. With this gesture, Ana Luiza allows the house – the absolute protagonist, although silent – of Águia de duas cabeças, to stop simply being “seen” and to “see” itself, with all the works, objects and people who occupy and visit it, and to question, perhaps, about the mystery of the world, about the visible and the invisible.

Projeto Caixa de Pandora, 2018 © Everton Ballardin
Projeto Caixa de Pandora, 2018 © Everton Ballardin

About the artist

Ana Dias Batista (São Paulo, 1978). Lives and works in São Paulo.

​​In 2000 she graduated in fine arts at ECA-USP. In 2014, she completed her doctorate at ECA-USP. In 2001 she did solo shows at Centro Cultural São Paulo and at the Adriana Penteado Gallery, in São Paulo. The following year, she carried out, with Eurico Lopes and Rodrigo Matheus, the Copan Plan, an independent project in the São Paulo historic building. She participated in the collectives 20 anos – 20 artists, 2002, CCSP, To be political it has to look nice, 2003, Apex art, New York, MAM [at] Oca, São Paulo, 2006 and the São Paulo S.A. symposium, Situation n. 2, 2002. She exhibited individually at Centro Maria Antônia, São Paulo, 2004. She received the Pampulha Scholarship and, in 2007, she presented an individual exhibition at the Pampulha Museum, Belo Horizonte. The following year, she completed a master’s degree in visual arts at ECA/USP and, still in São Paulo, she carried out, with Laura Andreato and João Loureiro, Vistosa, an independent project that was awarded the Funarte Connection Arts Award. In 2009, she presented the individual Programa at Estação Pinacoteca, São Paulo, and received an award from the São Paulo Secretariat of Culture. She has done solo shows at the galleries Mendes Wood, São Paulo (2010 and 2011), Ybakatu, Curitiba (2010) and Marília Razuk, São Paulo (2015). In 2013, she participated, among others, in the exhibitions Beyond the Library, Frankfurt Buchmesse/ Hall 4.1, Frankfurt, and Itochu Aoyama Art Square, Tokyo, Conversation Pieces, NBK, Berlin, Imagine Brazil/ Artist’s Books, Astrup Fearnley Museet, Oslo, and Economie Domestique, La Maudite, Paris. She held the solo exhibition Chão Comum at the Pinacoteca do Estado de S. Paulo (2018).

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PRESS

CONTACT

Founder and Executive Director
Camila Yunes Guarita

Director
Tamara Ganem

Art Advising / São Paulo
Florencia Azcune
Mariana Autuori
Nathalia Zemel

Art Advising / Rio de Janeiro
Maria Ferro

Collection Management
Thaís Franco
Mariana Leão

Artists Career Management
Paloma Vasconcellos
Ana Sant'Anna
Joana Leonor
Maria Gabriela Mexias
Thais Teotonio

Communications
Margherita De Natale
Ana Clara Caligiorne

Press Relations
Azzi & Co.
Rafael Azzi

hello@kuraarte.com.br
Av. Europa, 21 / São Paulo, Brasil

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